fork out something (on something)

fork out something (on something)
ˌfork ˈout (for sth) | ˌfork ˈout sth (for/on sth) derived
(informal) to spend a lot of money on sth, especially unwillingly

Why fork out for a taxi when there's a perfectly good bus service?

We've forked out a small fortune on their education.

Main entry:forkderived

Useful english dictionary. 2012.

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  • fork out something (for something) — ˌfork ˈout (for sth) | ˌfork ˈout sth (for/on sth) derived (informal) to spend a lot of money on sth, especially unwillingly • Why fork out for a taxi when there s a perfectly good bus service? • We ve forked out a small fortune on their… …   Useful english dictionary

  • fork out (for something) — ˌfork ˈout (for sth) | ˌfork ˈout sth (for/on sth) derived (informal) to spend a lot of money on sth, especially unwillingly • Why fork out for a taxi when there s a perfectly good bus service? • We ve forked out a small fortune on their… …   Useful english dictionary

  • fork out — verb to surrender someone or something to another the guard delivered the criminal to the police render up the prisoners render the town to the enemy fork over the money • Syn: ↑hand over, ↑fork over, ↑fork up, ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

  • fork out — phrasal verb [intransitive/transitive] Word forms fork out : present tense I/you/we/they fork out he/she/it forks out present participle forking out past tense forked out past participle forked out informal to spend money on something, especially …   English dictionary

  • fork out — PHRASAL VERB If you fork out for something, you spend a lot of money on it. [INFORMAL] [V P for/on n] He will have to fork out for private school fees for Nina... [V P] You don t ask people to fork out every time they drive up the motorways... [V …   English dictionary

  • fork — [fɔːk ǁ fɔːrk] verb fork out something phrasal verb [intransitive, transitive] informal to spend a lot of money on something, not because you want to but because you have to; =SHELL OUT: • Even more embarrassingly for the struggling bank, it had… …   Financial and business terms

  • fork — fork1 [fo:k US fo:rk] n ↑fork, ↑knife, ↑spoon [: Old English; Origin: forca, from Latin furca] 1.) a tool you use for picking up and eating food, with a handle and three or four points ▪ Put the knives and forks on the table. 2.) a garden tool… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • fork — [fôrk] n. [ME forke < OE forca & Anglo Fr forque (Fr fourche), both < L furca, two pronged fork] 1. an instrument of greatly varying size with a handle at one end and two or more pointed prongs at the other: forks are variously used as… …   English World dictionary

  • fork — ► NOUN 1) an implement with two or more prongs used for lifting or holding food. 2) a pronged farm or garden tool used for digging or lifting. 3) each of a pair of supports in which a bicycle or motorcycle wheel revolves. 4) the point where a… …   English terms dictionary

  • fork — fork1 [ fɔrk ] noun count * 1. ) a metal or plastic object used for eating, consisting of a handle with three or four sharp points on the end: knives, forks, and spoons Beat the mixture with a fork to blend the ingredients. 2. ) a garden tool… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

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